Monday, 1 December 2014

Promoting compliance with Diskus Inhaler use in asthma patients

Roger Watson, Editor

Inhalation medication is an essential therapy for patients with asthma. As the prevalence of asthma increases and increasing numbers of people depend on inhalers to help them breathe efficiently, and new designs of inhaler become available, then the techniques associated with these inhalers is increasingly important. A recent study by Mac Hale et al. (2014) titled A nurse-led intervention: promoting compliance with Diskus Inhaler use in asthma patients  and published in Nursing Open describes the effect of an educational programme on inhaler use. 

The importance of correct inhaler technique for asthma control is investigated. Inadequate patient instruction and poor patient inhaler technique impact significantly on asthma control as the therapeutic benefit is below optimal. This paper reports on a study which examined the value of a nurse-led programme to educate asthma patients on correct inhaler technique, specifically a Diskus inhaler. The study participants were attending a respiratory clinic and had used an inhaler for many years.

Through the use of a ten step Inhaler Proficiency Schedule and a Patient Reported Behaviour inventory it was shown that on initial assessment, only two steps of the Diskus inhaler technique were correctly completed by all participants. No one critical step was successfully completed by all participants at the first visit. Participants reported being careless about using their inhaler some of the time or all of the time. The overall results confirmed that a nurse led education programme can promote compliance with inhaler use in patients with asthma. Additionally inhaler technique education improved participant inhaler technique, participant confidence levels in relation to self-administration of the inhaler and adherence to prescribed frequency of use. 

Reference

Mac Hale E, Costello RW, Cowman S (2014) A nurse-led intervention: promoting compliance with Diskus Inhaler use in asthma patients Nursing Open doi: 10.1002/nop2.10

Monday, 24 November 2014

Nurse anaesthetists and handovers

Roger Watson, Editor

The work of nurse anaesthetists comes under scrutiny in an article from the USA by Testa and Emery (2014) titled Understanding the perceptions and experiences of Certified Registered Nurse Anaesthetists regarding handovers: a focus group study and published in Nursing Open.

The specific aspect of their work that is reported in the study is handovers. In the USA most anaesthetic work is carried out by Certified Registered Nurse Anaesthetists and, citing other work, the authors point to the crucial nature of safe handovers: 'Ineffective handovers contribute to increased threats to patient safety including medication errors, wrong site surgery and patient death'. Thus, the authors interviewed small groups of nurse anaesthetists to find out what their perceptions were of handovers and what had an impact on safety.

The participants identified four aspects of handovers that could influence the quality of handovers including: setting, timing, patient and provider (eg. nurse anaesthetist) characteristics.  In the words of the authors: 'This study is a first step in identifying what factors promulgate effective handovers and what barriers exist to effective handovers. Further research, such as a survey of CRNA perception of handovers, would be needed before generalizing this information. If shown to be generalizable to a broader population of nurse anaesthetists, this knowledge has far-reaching potential import for future education, practice and policy development.'

Reference

Testa D, Emery S (2014) Understanding the perceptions and experiences of Certified Registered Nurse Anaesthetists regarding handovers: a focus group study Nursing Open doi: 10.1002/nop2.9


Sunday, 5 October 2014

Internet use by carers of people with dementia

Roger Watson, Editor

Internet use is increasing and a major reason for internet use is to seek health related information.  People seek information about their own health and about the people they are caring for and a study by Kim et al. (2014) titled: A secondary data analysis of Internet use in caregivers of persons with dementia and published in Nursing Open looks at internet use by carers of people with dementia.  In the words of the authors: 'Caregivers with poor health reported higher levels of caregiver stress appraised, which was associated with more Internet use for health-related purposes. It is required to develop effective Internet-based resources to meet the needs of highly stressed caregivers of persons with dementia.'

Reference

Kim H, Rose KM, Netemeyer RG, Merwin EI, Williams IC (2014) A secondary data analysis of Internet use in caregivers of persons with dementia Nursing Open doi:10.1002/nop2.2

Meet the Editors: Riitta Suhonen

Five Things About Riitta


Riitta Suhonen PhD, RN is Professor in Nursing Science and has a speciality in older people nursing science (Research and Education in Elderly Care) since 2011. She works in the Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Finland. 


1. Why did you become a nurse?

While I was a child I was often sick. One day while I was about 10 years old, sick again, I was speaking with my aunt. She had studied to be a nurse in Europe and worked in the United States and was visiting us in Finland. She asked me what I want to be while growing older. She advised to select a carrier in which I can help others. After high school, I really had many options in my mind, but surely the most interesting and attractive was work in healthcare. Thus, I first aimed to be a doctor, but was working as nurse’s aide in summer time, and had the idea of being a nurse. I graduated from nursing school, but continued my career a bit later in the university, obtained a masters and soon after that continued my doctoral studies. My clinical background is in surgical nursing care in a regional hospital, and I was also a senior ward sister on the same ward. After that, I was a quality and development manager of one healthcare area for many years.

2. Why did you become an editor?

I have been interested in scientific writing for many years. I teach in the masters and doctoral programme in the University of Turku. At the moment, I have over 120 peer-reviewed scientific publications. While having published a lot, I was also keen on seeing the publication process from the other side, from the editor’s desk and publishing house. I have been an editorial board member for many journals, and also committed to this work with journal editors, editorial board members and publishing house staff. I am currently the editor of the Finnish Journal of Nursing Science, but I will be stepping down from that position at the end of this year.

3. What advice would you give to aspiring editors?

An editor’s position is significant and the work is demanding. However, this position can advance scientist’s carrier and there is still lots to learn all the time. Life is learning. I would advise to take your moment and take the job if somebody is offering the opportunity. This position is on the frontier of current developments in the field.

4. What are the main challenges for nursing in the next decade?

Healthcare systems have gone through many structural changes during recent years, but investment in the content of care and services has not matched this. We nurses can be better in meeting individuals' needs and using our knowledge for the benefit of people’s health and health promotion, not only in those tasks that we are currently executing with the patient, for example at the time in hospital unit. Research-based evidence is increasingly available, but we do not use it as efficiently we could to improve the content of clinical care. Healthcare systems strive for person-centered care in their strategies but the viewpoint or perspective of the patient is still largely missing. The ageing population will have a strong impact on the use of care and services in all organisations worldwide in the near future. However, the evidence points out that the care that is available does not take into account that people are different, and this viewpoint has not been sufficiently integrated into the development of healthcare services currently. There is need to strengthen the user’s involvement in developing healthcare services to better suit them and to be individualised enough to support their self-care, self-management and independent living.

5. Who do you recommend to follow on Twitter?

I have to say I am not a very active user of social media. I admire people who can easily connect with others all around the world, and seems to do that very easily. I advise you to follow Nursing Open (as the journal is going to have a strong impact in nursing and nursing science) and our editor-in-chief Roger Watson’s activities – he is a busy man but offers good information where ever he is.

Thursday, 11 September 2014

The Try to Quit Smoking instrument

Roger Watson, Editor

Our second paper published in Nursing Open comes from Sweden and is about developing an instrument to measure the pressures that people feel when they try to stop smoking.  The paper, by Lundh et al. (2014), analyses data from 63 people using a 17-item questionnaire to produce a 14-item questionnaire that measures three aspects of trying to stop smoking:
  • development of pressure-filled mental states (eg I feel criticized for not being able to quite smoking)
  • use of destructive pressure-relief strategies (eg it is unnecessary to quit because I am too old)
  • ambivalent thoughts (eg I do not get support and encouragement when I try to quit smoking)

Reference
Lundh L, Alinaghizadeh H, Tornkvist L, Gilljam H, Galanti MR (2014) Measurement of factors that negatively influence the outcome of quitting to smoke among patients with COPD: psychometric analyses of the Try TO Quite Smoking instrument Nursing Open doi: 10.1102/nop2.4
  

Wednesday, 30 July 2014

Our first article is online and available

Roger Watson, Editor

I am very pleased to announce our first article to be published is by Kim et al. (2104), titled: 'A secondary data analysis of Internet use in caregivers of persons with dementia'.

The article is based on a survey called the National Alliance for Caregiving telephone survey, conducted in the USA and gathering 258 responses.  Using structural equation modelling the analysis showed, in the words of the authors: 'Caregivers with poor health reported higher levels of caregiver stress appraised, which was associated with more Internet use for health-related purposes.'



Reference

Kim, H., Rose, K. M., Netemeyer, R. G., Merwin, E. I. and Williams, I. C. (2014), A secondary data analysis of Internet use in caregivers of persons with dementia Nursing Open doi: 10.1002/nop2.2

Thursday, 24 April 2014

Meet the Editors: Alex Clark

Five Things About Alex

1. Why did you become a nurse?

For pragmatic rather than deeply philosophical reasons. My life had taken a difference course – into building and surveying. Youthful though I was, I quickly realized I did not like this choice. I knew lots of nurses and they seemed to enjoy it. It harnessed a good mixture of people and technical skills. Finally, it seemed to be a very practical qualification that would always be in demand. It was a good decision and I never regret it. Never.

2. Why did you become an editor?

Again, fairly accidentally via becoming Associate Dean (Research) and taking on the editorship of the International Journal of Qualitative Methodology as part of leading the International Institute of Qualitative Methodology. I reviewed lots of papers and it is a great way to stay one step ahead in your discipline – to see the best work and hopefully improve this work at a formative stage. Everything takes more time but editing is a vital support to the global community of researchers while interacting with authors and their papers helps your own knowledge, expertise and writing. What’s not to like?

3. What advice would you give to aspiring editors?

Don’t compromise your standards. Don’t expect perfection. Support cutting-edge ideas even though they may still need development. It is far easier to knock a house down than build one – so don’t be too critical. Get involved as a reviewer any way you can. It is fun and you will learn lots.

4. What are the main challenges for nursing in the next decade?

Depends where in the world. In low and middle-income countries, addressing the needs of the rapidly aging population with chronic disease will be huge. Health systems have more limited capacity and nurses can play a huge role in fostering good prevention, effective self-care and mobilizing support from families. In high-income countries, ensuring the profession’s credibility, perceived value and distinctive contributions relative to other disciplines and new professions (like physician’s assistants) will be key. Across the world – there has never been a better or more important time to be a nurse who uses research evidence.

5. Who do you recommend to follow on Twitter?

Me: (@alexclark1944) to keep you informed about qualitative research, comedy people @JosieLong and @RealBobMortimer to keep you smiling and all the people you admire to keep you connected.


Thursday, 10 April 2014

Meet the Editors: Seamus Cowman

Five Things About Seamus

1. Why did you become a nurse?

When I finished secondary school in Ireland I had no real direction on what career I might pursue. Rural Ireland in the 1970s was not exactly a metropolis, flush with opportunity. My cousin was a first year student nurse and my uncle was a psychiatric nurse and both of them had a major influence on my selection of nursing as a career. I started my career as a student psychiatric nurse at St Patrick's Hospital Dublin. St Patrick's was founded over 260 years ago by Jonathan Swift, of Gulliver’s Travels fame. It was a wonderful start to my career and I learned the fundamental principles of nursing in an institution with very high standards. I recognised the need to become a general nurse and among the reasons mentioned in the correspondence rejecting my application to Irish hospitals was because I was a male. So I decided to leave Ireland and my next move was to Epsom, Surrey to undertake general nurse training. Again I have very pleasant memories of Epsom Hospital, and my career really blossomed in England and the seeds of my future academic career were sown.

2. Why did you become an editor?

My interest in being an editor basically arises from ongoing writing, publication and refereeing of papers throughout my career. My experience of editing is in varied form including books and also with professional publications when I worked with the Irish Nursing Board. In association with a colleague Hugh McKenna from the University of Ulster we recognised the need for an Irish Nursing Journal to provide nurses North and South of Ireland with an opportunity to write and debate, and we founded and became joint editors of the All Ireland Journal of Nursing & Midwifery. Nursing Open now presents another opportunity for editing and as a new nursing journal it will be exciting to observe the growth of the journal.

3. What advice would you give to aspiring editors?

It’s an opportunity to be at the cutting edge of nursing literature. I think a track record of publication including acceptances and rejections of papers is a humbling and important learning experiencing in refining the skills required for an editorial role.

4. What are the main challenges for nursing in the next decade?
The world financial recession and the resulting constraints on healthcare budgets have meant that nursing has been a soft target for cutbacks in an unplanned pattern. We are not clear about the impact of such rapid and unplanned changes in nursing and it presents a great danger to recent nursing developments related the scope of nursing practice and in particular developing clinical career pathways in areas of autonomous and specialist practice.

5. Who do you recommend to follow on Twitter?

Social media has become an obsession in some people’s lives with many people subscribing to all forms of transmission and the personal messages are endless. I keenly follow organisational and societies' Twitter accounts, and I also find the accounts of political figures interesting. At RCSI Bahrain we have just set up a twitter account for our Chapter of Sigma Theata Tau: @ruffaidasociety.

Wednesday, 9 April 2014

Meet the Editors: Allison Williams

Five Things About Allison

1. Why did you become a nurse?

Like Roger, I started out as a nurse associate. I worked in a midwifery unit in my school holidays where my mother was a midwife. I hadn’t the faintest idea about babies and kept pretty much to myself. However, this experience has stayed with me and may have lit the lamp for my nursing career. I qualified as a registered nurse in a large country town in Victoria, Australia, three years later. My work now as Director of the Monash Nursing Academy is a long way from these humble but incredibly valuable beginnings.

2. Why did you become an editor?

Good question. I enjoy the scholarly aspect of nursing having spent a good deal of my life working in the clinical environment. I enjoy reading about nursing and I like writing even though it takes me a lot of time to create a paper I am satisfied with.

3. What advice would you give to aspiring editors?

If you are offered the opportunity, take it! You need to be prepared to spend quality time on editorial work. Good time management skills are essential.

4. What are the main challenges for nursing in the next decade?
  • Maintaining quality of care for people who require long term care. 
  • Having a say in health policy affecting patient care. For example, multinational companies eager to grab a chunk of the healthcare market without considering the consumer’s point of view or the value of the money spent.

5. Who do you recommend to follow on Twitter?

I am a new tweeter- yet to be decided.


Friday, 21 March 2014

Welcome to Nursing Open

Roger Watson, Editor

Welcome to Nursing Open and welcome to our blog. Nursing Open is a new online, open access, pay to publish journal. You can check our aims and scope and guidelines for authors on our new website. There you can also listen to me on YouTube telling you about the journal and what we hope to achieve, and you can read my inaugural editorial. By way of introduction to me you can read ten interesting things about me on the Journal of Advanced Nursing (JAN) blog here. In due course we will introduce you to each of the Associate Editors of Nursing Open in the pages of this blog.

The purpose of this blog is to give me and the Associate Editors the opportunity to write about things that interest us and which may interest you and help inform you about what is going on in the journal and in the world of academic nursing publishing. We will also highlight particular articles that have especially interested us. I hope you will follow the blog and that you will follow us on Twitter. You can also keep up with Wiley Open Access on Facebook. The blog also affords you the opportunity to join in the debate.

Enjoy the blog, read the journal and please consider Nursing Open for your next publication.