Tuesday, 12 September 2017

Predatory publishers and journal hi-jackers

Predatory publishers and journal hi-jackers

The peer review process

The peer review process

Can I submit my manuscript to more than one journal at the same time?

Can I submit my manuscript to more than one journal at the same time?

Dealing with reviewers' comments

Dealing with reviewers' comments

Presenting your manuscript

Presenting your manuscript

Who should be an author on a scientific article and who should not?

Who should be an author on a scientific article and who should not?

Open access publishing Newcastle NSW October 2015

Open access publishing Newcastle NSW October 2015

Making manuscripts better for English journals

Making manuscripts better for English journals

Four easy steps to getting your manuscript published

Four easy steps to getting your manuscript published

Using social media to promote your research and scholarship

Using social media to promote your research and scholarship

The Conversation explained

The Conversation explained

Academic Publishing Myth 1 - You must learn to write in English

Academic Publishing Myth 1 - You must learn to write in English

Academic Publishing Myth 3 - myths surrounding publishing from MSc dissertations and PhD theses

Academic Publishing Myth 3 - myths surrounding publishing from MSc dissertations and PhD theses

Acaemic publishing myths 4 - journals do not like reviews

Acaemic publishing myths 4 - journals do not like reviews

Writing for publication: Tips and future directions

Writing for publication: Tips and future directions

Academic pubishing myths 5 - it is wrong to cite yourself

Academic pubishing myths 5 - it is wrong to cite yourself

Friday, 8 September 2017

Chronic heart failure in Sweden

Roger Watson, Editor

The aim of this study from Sweden was to: 'compare coping strategies and quality of life (QoL) in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) with such strategies and QOL in persons from two general Swedish populations and to investigate relationships between personal characteristics and coping strategies.' Over 120 patients and over 500 of the general population were compared.

Resuts show that: 'women in the patient group used more optimistic, fatalistic, evasive as well as problem-and emotion-focused coping than did women in the population group. Men in the patient group used more optimistic and evasive coping than men in the population group did, whereas men in the population group used more confrontative and emotive coping. Within-group differences showed that women in both groups used more problem-and emotion-focused coping than men did' and '(y)ounger women and women who perceived an unsatisfactory economic situation and low efficiency in managing the psychological aspects of daily life used more emotion-focused coping. Younger men with a higher education and men who perceived an unsatisfactory economic situation and low efficiency in managing the psychological aspects of daily life used also more emotion-focused coping.'

The authors concluded: 'In this study women used more problem-focused as well as emotion-focused coping strategies than men did. In addition, women in the patient group used coping the most. Compared with the Swedish general population, patients with CHF rated lower QoL. To deal with the psychological consequences of daily life, men with CHF and persons in the general Swedish population reported using both problem-and emotion-focused coping. This indicates the need to investigate what meaning-based coping can add to this research area and to clinical practice. However, nurses need to assess the coping strategies the patients use and encouraged patients abilities  to improve their self-management.'

Reference

Nilsson A, Carlsson M, Lindvqist R, Kristofferzon M-L (2017) A comparative correlational study of coping strategies and quality of life in patients with chronic heart failure and the general Swedish population Nursing Open DOI: 10.1002/nop2.81

Women woth COPD

Roger Watson, Editor

The aim of this study was to: 'explore women’s experiences of living with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) at home.' The study was carried out in Sweden and nine women were interviewed. 

The study was carried out because: '(p)revious studies have described women’s experiences of living with COPD by comparing men and women. They suggest that women with COPD experience more severe dyspnoea, higher levels of anxiety and depression, poorer quality of life and more exacerbations than men.' 

The results shwoed that: '(t)hese women experienced limitations related to the traditional female role and felt unable to fulfil their own expectations.' The authors concluded: 'Nurses should be aware that women with COPD in addition to experience problems and concerns because of their illness could struggle to accept that they no longer are able to live up to their own expectations of the traditional female. Women may need particular support from nurses to reconcile and accept the loss of their traditional female role'.

Reference

Steindal SA, Ӧsterling J, Halvorsen K, Schjelderup T, Kive E, Sørbye LW, Dihle A (2017) A qualitative study of women’s experiences of living with COPD Nursing Open DOI: 10.1002/nop2.86